Review: Flowers at Chapter Arts.

Tonight
we went to Chapter Arts to see Big Loop Theatre’s production of
Flowers. I
last saw one of their productions this time last year at Jacobs
Antique Market when they performed Moirai and I was really intrigued
to see if their new production would be similar or not.

The
stage was set, a flower shop with an array of colours and textures,
and
a young man standing behind the counter. The atmosphere appeared
quite spooky to begin with, but this feeling was diffused by the
humour of the opening scene.

The
story follows two brothers, Danny (Duncan Hallis) and Billy (Cory
Tucker), who were left by their parents to run the family owned
flower shop.I
think both actors were wonderful upon the stage. In my opinion, when
you have less actors, you have more pressure; pressure to perform and
offer entertainment to the audience without a break, pressure to
remember lines and hold the audiences attention. I have so much
admiration for Hallis and Tucker, because they nailed it.

The
audience reacted well to the humour
of the production, but I sometimes felt the humour was masking the more bitter-sweet
storytelling. The story was heartbreaking to me; it made me think of
my
own children and my love for them.

I’m easily drawn in when it comes to an interesting and detailed
storyline, and I’m also (as my mother describes me) full of empathy.
I felt the story told more than a humorous anecdote, and several
times I questioned the character’s ages; their behaviour child-like and playful, but their language more adult-like.

I
definitely felt they behaved in a child-like way, a childish
behaviour (that I love, and you’ll know that if you read my posts!)
and also a behaviour to eliminate the stark truth of their reality.
They use their memories and imaginations to remember the past, but
also they work together to a conclusion, no matter how dark and
distressing.

I
thought Hallis and Tucker had great chemistry and comedic timing,
plus their acting as a whole was outstanding (they multi tasked like
mad people!) and their vibe on stage positive and engaging.

I
felt it was very cleverly
written, from both perspectives, and the use of props to portray the
parents was amusing, clever and (for me) extremely heartbreaking.
Watching their story unfold I felt very unnerved, yet their humour and behaviour created a softer
blow.

There’s
a lot of hope in this production, but also an important message to
parents and those children who have ever felt ‘left behind’ by their
folks.

This
life isn’t an easy one, and this play portrays a pretty sinister
story, yet at the centre of their story lies a great and solid heart.

 

Disclosure:
I received tickets in exchange for review. All opinions are 100%
honest and my own.

 

 

 

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